The rhinoceros hornbill is one of the largest birds found in the rainforests of South East Asia.

With their impressively large wing span these hornbills can create a loud 'woosh' noise - and coupled with their distinctive beak and piercing eyes these birds can be quite intimidating.

Their name comes from the rather obvious helmet-like structure on the top of their beak, which is called a casque.

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Interesting facts

Where they live: South East Asia.

Habitat: Lowland/montane, tropical/sub-tropical rainforests.

Diet: Fruit, berries, especially many different types of figs. Occasionally different types of large insects, small reptiles, mammals and birds.

Weight: 2 - 3kg

Threats: Deforestation and hunting

Species Information

Scientific name Buceros rhinoceros silvestris
Order Coraciiformes
Family Bucerotidae
Genus Buceros
IUCN status Near Threatened
Roles in the zoo

Research (ex situ): This species is part of applied research that leads to evidence-based decisions regarding in-zoo management.

In situ Conservation Ambassador

Species conservation: This is a species for which we have a significant focus on in the wild, as part of our conservation projects and programmes around the world.

Habitat conservation: This is a species that we support through our habitat-focused conservation projects and programmes around the world.

Education

Interdependence: This species helps demonstrate that all living things, including humans, live in ecosystems and depend on other living things for their survival.

Human Impact: This species helps demonstrate that human activities are causing serious environmental damage.

Partnerships: This species helps demonstrate that we work in partnerships with other organisations to conserve nature and natural resources.

Chester Zoo: This species helps demonstrate that as a charity Chester Zoo’s mission is to be a major force in conserving biodiversity worldwide.

Husbandry Development and/or Skills Training: This is a species for which we’re developing particular husbandry methods to address an identified issue and/or helping to build staff capacity in specific husbandry or field conservation skills.