09 15/09/2016

Chester Zoo re-launches global campaign to save some of the world’s most threatened species

Chester Zoo is re-launching its global Act For Wildlife conservation campaign, as scientists report that the world is on the brink of its sixth mass extinction.

A critically endangered Eastern black rhino in Kenya - caught on camera by Chester Zoos collections director Mike Jordan on a recent field trip
A critically endangered Eastern black rhino in Kenya - caught on camera by Chester Zoos collections director Mike Jordan on a recent field trip

Conservationists at the zoo are calling on the public to join them in the urgent fight to save the planet’s rich biodiversity – from fundraising to planting wildflowers, buying sustainably produced products or reporting wildlife crime.

The zoo - one of the UK’s leading conservation charities - is re-doubling its commitment to save some of the planet’s most endangered species from extinction.

The new conservation campaign website – www.actforwildlife.org.uk – offers members of the public a chance to take action themselves in the fight to preserve some of the most vulnerable species.

Supported by a major advertising campaign, it provides a range of opportunities for fundraising, tips on how to make wildlife-friendly purchases and inspirational stories and images from the wild.

Tigers in Nepal where Chester Zoo's Act for Wildlife movement is working to ensure they live in harmony with humans
Tigers in Nepal where Chester Zoo's Act for Wildlife movement is working to ensure they live in harmony with humans

Chester Zoo already delivers around 80 projects to help endangered animals and habitats in more than 30 countries worldwide – from preventing the deaths of elephants and local people in Assam in India by eradicating human-wildlife conflict, to the reintroduction of the large heath butterfly to its natural habitat in Lancashire, England.

Zoo conservationists hope that by generating even greater public support right now, more species can be saved from extinction.

Scott Wilson, head of field conservation at Chester Zoo, said:

“We won’t stand back and let habitat destruction and threats to wildlife continue unchecked. We strongly believe that every one of us can help and that together we can make a big difference. We know that what we start here will have a huge impact globally and we won’t give up.”